News Flash

Home

Posted on: July 28, 2022

Monkeypox information

monkey pox image

Monkeypox is a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus. Monkeypox virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox. Monkeypox symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms, but milder, and monkeypox is rarely fatal. Monkeypox is not related to chickenpox.

Monkeypox was discovered in 1958 when two outbreaks of a pox-like disease occurred in colonies of monkeys kept for research. Despite being named “monkeypox,” the source of the disease remains unknown. However, African rodents and non-human primates (like monkeys) might harbor the virus and infect people.

The first human case of monkeypox was recorded in 1970. Prior to the 2022 outbreak, monkeypox had been reported in people in several central and western African countries. Previously, almost all monkeypox cases in people outside of Africa were linked to international travel to countries where the disease commonly occurs or through imported animals. These cases occurred on multiple continents.



To learn more about the Monkeypox Virus please use the links below to the CDC and GA Department of Public Health Websites.

https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/index.html
https://dph.georgia.gov/monkeypox

For further questions please contact the Dade County Department of Health at 706-657-4213


NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Aug. 15,2022

ROME, GA: The Georgia Department of Public Health Northwest Health District has received limited doses of monkeypox vaccine as part of the distribution of federally funded JYNNEOSTM vaccine to public health districts throughout Georgia. These vaccines are available at no cost to the individual. However, due to a limited number of doses, the vaccines are available online by appointment only, depending on supply, and only for people who are currently eligible for the vaccine.

Eligibility is based on the CDC recommendation to prioritize people who are aged 18 and older and are at high risk of infection, including people who are:

  • a contact to a monkeypox case identified in the last 14 days by public health via case investigation,
  • HIV positive and have multiple sex partners,
  • a man who has sex with men (MSM) and is having multiple sex partners, or
  • a PrEP patient and having multiple sex partners

If you meet the eligibility criteria for monkeypox vaccination, please register online at https://gta-vras.powerappsportals.us/en-US/ for an available appointment at the nearest monkeypox vaccination site, which includes ten locations in the Northwest Health District:

  • Bartow County Health Department: 5355 Hwy-20 NE, Cartersville, GA 30121  Phone: (770) 382-1920
  • Catoosa County Health Department: 145 Catoosa Circle, Ringgold, GA 30736  Phone: (706)406-2000
  • Chattooga County Health Department: 60 Farrar Drive, Summerville, GA 30747  Phone: (706) 857-3471
  • Dade County Health Department: 71 Case Avenue, Ste H-100, Trenton, Ga. 30752  Phone: (706) 657-4213
  • Floyd County Health Department: 16 East 12th Street, Rome, GA 30161  Phone: (706) 295-6123
  • Gordon County Health Department: 310 N. River Street, Calhoun, GA 30701  Phone: (706) 624-1444
  • Haralson County Health Department: 133 Buchanan Bypass, Buchanan, GA 30113  Phone: (770) 646-5541
  • Paulding County Health Department: 451 Jimmy Campbell Parkway, Dallas, GA 30132  Phone: (770) 443-7881
  • Polk County Health Department: 25 East Ware Street, Cedartown, GA 30123  Phone: (770) 749-2270
  • Walker County Health Department: 603 East Villanow Street, LaFayette, GA 30728  Phone: (706) 638-5577

You may also call the Vaccine Scheduling Resource Line at 888- 457-0186.

Allocations of monkeypox vaccine from the federal government will increase as production of the vaccine intensifies. Learn more about JYNNEOSTM vaccine at www.cdc.gov/smallpox/clinicians/vaccines.html 

Monkeypox testing is also available at no cost to residents by appointment only at our ten county health departments listed above . Anyone who believes they may have monkeypox and wants to be tested should first isolate at home away from others and call their medical provider or county health department to discuss the signs and symptoms.

Testing is only recommended for people who are experiencing any of these signs or symptoms for monkeypox:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches and backache
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Chills
  • Exhaustion
  • Respiratory symptoms (e.g., sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough)
  • A rash that may be located on or near the genitals (penis, testicles, labia, and vagina) or anus but could also be on other areas like the hands, feet, chest, face, or mouth.

o The rash will go through several stages, including scabs, before healing.

o The rash can look like pimples or blisters and may be painful or itchy.

Please do not arrive at the health department for testing without a pre-registered appointment.

The monkeypox virus can spread from person-to-person through direct contact with the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids. It also can be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling, or sex.

Things you can do to protect yourself from getting monkeypox are to avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox; avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used; and wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after using the bathroom.

For more information about monkeypox, visit Monkeypox | Poxvirus | CDC

###


NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Aug. 9, 2022

Monkeypox Transmission in Public Settings
How to Prevent Spread of Infection

ATLANTA –The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) continues to closely monitor the current outbreak of monkeypox in the state. As of today, there are 625 confirmed monkeypox
cases in Georgia. Testing and vaccination are available in health districts throughout the state; however, vaccine supplies from the federal government remain limited.

The monkeypox virus can spread from person-to-person through direct contact with the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids. It also can be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact, or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling, or sex.

More than 90% of the people with monkeypox in the current outbreak generally report having close, sustained physical contact with other people who have monkeypox. While many of those affected in the current global outbreaks are gay, bisexual, or other men who have sex with men, anyone who has been in close contact with someone who has monkeypox can get the illness. 

Touching items (such as clothing or linens) that previously touched the infectious rash or body fluids is another way monkeypox spreads but has not been identified to be a common mode of transmission in this outbreak or for monkeypox in general.

The risk of contracting monkeypox is based on exposure – an individual must be exposed to enough virus to become infected. What is currently known about monkeypox transmission indicates that sharing bedding or towels with someone who is infected with monkeypox would carry more risk than passing encounters with money or a door handle or other environmental surfaces.

Most non-healthcare settings where people congregate such as workplaces, schools, grocery stores, gas station, or public transportation are not considered high risk settings for monkeypox transmission. It is important to remember that monkeypox is not transmitted like COVID and typically takes skin-to-skin or other close contact to transmit. Unlike COVID or measles, this means far lower risk to persons that may be in a room with someone with monkeypox, but who do not have contact with the infected individual.

There are things you can do to protect yourself from getting monkeypox:

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox.
    • Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox.
    • Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone with monkeypox.
  • Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used.
    • Do not share eating utensils or cups with a person with monkeypox.
    • Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of a person with monkeypox. 
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom.

For more information on monkeypox, visit https://dph.georgia.gov/monkeypox or https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/index.html.







Additional Info...
Facebook Twitter Email

Other News in Home

2022 election and voting information page header

2022 Elections and Voting Information

Posted on: October 3, 2022
at a glance website photo 2

Dade County at a glance

Posted on: October 1, 2020
Agenda logo

Meeting Agendas, Minutes and More

Posted on: July 15, 2021
Apply today for rental assistance

Georgia Rental Assistance Program

Posted on: May 13, 2022
DFCS

Dade DFCS Office now OPEN

Posted on: June 7, 2022
DDS

Georgia Department of Driver Services

Posted on: December 24, 2020
COVID-19 INFO and FAW Title Page

COVID-19 FAQs, INFO

Posted on: March 4, 2020
USDA NRCS logo

USDA / NRCS ANNOUNCEMENT

Posted on: September 9, 2021